1 AASA, The School Superintendents Association and the Children’s Defense Fund. “Insure Our Children, Ensure Our Future,” School Governance & Leadership, Fall 2013. Alexandria, VA. http://www.pageturnpro.com/AASA/52801-School-Governance-Leadership-Fall-2013/index.html#1

 2 Southern Education Foundation. “A New Majority Research Bulletin: Low Income Students Now a Majority in the Nation’s Public Schools.” January 2015. Atlanta, GA.

3 Blumberg L, Karpman M, Buettgens M, and Solleveld P. “Who are the Remaining Uninsured, and What Do Their Characteristics Tell Us About How to Reach Them?” The Urban Institute. March 2016. Washington, DC, http://www.rwjf.org/content/dam/farm/reports/issue_briefs/2016/rwjf427898

4Houston Independent School District. “Brandon’s Story.” October 28, 2015. Houston, TX. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kf0sTooHLBY&feature=youtu.be

5 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Health and Academic Achievement. 2014. Atlanta, GA.http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/index.htm

6 Basch, Charles E. “Healthier Students Are Better Learners: A Missing Link in Efforts to Close the Achievement Gap. Columbia University.” 2010. New York, NY. http://www.equitycampaign.org/i/a/document/12557_EquityMattersVol6_Web03082010.pdf

7 Burwell, Sylvia, and King Jr., John B. “Joint Letter to Chief State School Officers and State Health Officials on the Connection Between Health and Education Services.” U.S. Department of Education. January 15, 2016. Washington, D.C. http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/guid/secletter/160115.html

8 U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. “Healthy Students, Promising Futures.” January 2016. Washington D.C. http://www2.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/healthy-students/toolkit.pdf

9 Wheatley, Margaret. “Ten Principles for Creating Health Community.” http://margaretwheatley.com/

10 https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/senate-bill/1177/text

11 https://www.congress.gov/bill/107th-congress/house-bill/1

12 AASA, the School Superintendents Association and the Children’s Defense Fund. “Insure Our Children, Ensure Our Future,” School Governance & Leadership, Fall 2013. Alexandria, VA. http://www.pageturnpro.com/AASA/52801-School-Governance-Leadership- Fall-2013/index.html#1

13 Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, and Georgetown University Center for Children and Families. “Expanding Coverage for Parents Helps Children: Children’s Groups Have a Key Role to Play Urging States to Move Forward and Expand Medicaid.” 2013. Washington, D.C. http://www.cbpp.org/sites/default/files/atoms/files/expanding-coverage-for-parents-helps-children7-13.pdf

14 Dee Mahan. “Expanding Medicaid Helps Children Succeed in School,” Families USA. 2014. Washington, D.C. http://familiesusa.org/blog/2014/07/expanding-medicaid-helps-children-succeed-school

15 U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 2015 Annual Social and Economic Supplement accessed through CPS Table Creator. “Table HI08: Health Insurance Coverage Status and Type of Coverage by Selected Characteristics for Children Under 18: 2014.” https://www2.census.gov/programs-surveys/cps/techdocs/cpsmar15.pdf

16 Blumberg L, Karpman M, Buettgens M, and Solleveld P. “Who are the Remaining Uninsured, and What Do Their Characteristics Tell Us About How to Reach Them?” The Urban Institute. March 2016. Washington D.C. http://www.rwjf.org/content/dam/farm/reports/issue_briefs/2016/rwjf427898

17 The Children’s Defense Fund. “The Health Insurance Landscape for Children.” 2016. Washington, D.C. http://www.insureallchildren.org/resources/healthinsurancelanscape.pdf

18 The Children’s Defense Fund. “What Schools Need to Know about Helping Immigrant Children.” 2016. Washington, D.C. http://www.insureallchildren.org/resources/helping-immigrant-children.pdf

19 Evers, Tony, PhD. “Student Records and Confidentiality.” Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. January 2013. Madison, WI. https://dpi.wi.gov/sites/default/files/imce/sspw/pdf/srconfid.pdf

20 U.S Department of Health and Human Services. “Your Rights Under HIPAA.” http://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-individuals/guidancematerials-for-consumers/index.html

21 U.S. Department of Education. “Data-Sharing Toolkit for Communities: How to Leverage Community Relationships While Protecting Student Privacy.” 2016. Washington, DC. http://www2.ed.gov/programs/promiseneighborhoods/datasharingtool.pdf

22 Houston Independent School District. “Houston ISD Health Coverage Areas: Fall 2015 School Based Health Centers and Mobile Clinics.” Fall 2015. Houston, TX. http://www.insureallchildren.org/resources/houston-isd-health-coverage.pdf

23 Chester, Alisa, and Alker, Joan. “Medicaid at 50: A Look at the Long-Term Benefits of Childhood Medicaid.” Georgetown University Center for Children and Families. Washington, D.C. July 2015. http://ccf.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Medicaidat-50_final.pdf

24 Karan, Elizabeth and Vance Gopalan, Susannah. “A Change in Federal Policy Allows for More Access to Preventive and Primary Health Care Services." The Network of Public Health Law. June 2015. St. Paul, MN https://www.networkforphl.org/the_network_blog/2015/06/08/641/a_change_in_federal_policy_allows_for_more_access_to_preventive_and_primary_health_care_services

25 Center for Budget and Policy Priorities and the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute. “Expanding Coverage for Parents Helps Children; Children’s Groups Have a Key Role in Urging States to Move Forward and Expand Medicaid." July 19, 2012. Washington, D.C. http://ccf.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Expanding-Coverage-for-Parents.pdf

26 Georgetown University Health Policy Institute Center for Children and Families. “Medicaid Expansion: Good for Parents and Children.” January 2014. Washington, D.C. http://ccf.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Expanding-Coverage-for-Parents-Helps-Children-2013.pdf

27 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. CMS Connecting Kids to Coverage Campaign. “Making Outreach Work: Ten Things Schools Can Do.” Washington, D.C. https://www.insurekidsnow.gov/downloads/library/misc/ideas-10thingsschoolscando-boy-english.pdf

28 U.S. Department of Education and US Department of Health and Human Services. Healthy Students, Promising Futures. January 2016. Washington D.C. http://www2.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/healthy-students/toolkit.pdf

29The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. “Connecting Kids to Coverage National Campaign. https://www.insurekidsnow.gov/initiatives/connecting-kids/index.html

30 The Children’s Defense Fund. “Tell Your Story!” 2016. Washington, D.C. http://www.insureallchildren.org/reach/storycollection.html

31 Wright Edelman, Marian. “Child Watch® Column: Keeping Children Healthy, In School, and Learning.” The Huffington Post. January 2016. http://www.childrensdefense.org/newsroom/child-watch-columns/child-watch-documents/KeepingChildrenHealthyInSchoolandLearning.html

32 Edinburg Consolidated Independent School District Office of Public Information. “Student Health Comes First in Edinburg, Texas.” October, 2015. Edinburg, Texas. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0o2iGac_kyg&feature=youtu.be

33 Brooks Tricia, Miskell, Sean, Artiga, Samantha, Cornachione, Elizabeth, and Gates, Alexandria. “Medicaid and CHIP Eligibility, Enrollment, Renewal, and Cost-Sharing Policies as of January 2016: Findings from a 50-State Survey” Kaiser Family Foundation and Georgetown University Center for Children and Families. January 2016. Washington, D.C.

34 Texas Health and Human Services Commission. “How to Renew.” 2014. https://chipmedicaid.org/CommunityOutreach/How-to-Renew

35 AASA, The School Superintendents Association and the Children’s Defense Fund. “Telling Your Story: A Template for monitoring and evaluating your work.” 2016. Alexandria, VA and Washington, D.C. http://www.insureallchildren.org/resources/telling-your-story-template.pdf

36 AASA, The School Superintendents Association and the Children’s Defense Fund. “Monthly Reporting Template: Internal Tracking and Enrollment Data.” 2016. Alexandria, VA and Washington, D.C. http://www.insureallchildren.org/resources/monthly-reporting-template.pdf

37 Schell et al. Implementation Science. 2013, 8:15. http://www.implementationscience.com/content/8/1/15

38 Children’s Defense Fund-California. “Importance of Advocacy in Achieving Policy Change: A Case Study from California.” 2016. Los Angeles, CA. http://www.insureallchildren.org/resources/achievingpolicychange.pdf

39 The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Medicaid School-Based Administrative Claiming Guide. May 2003. Baltimore, MD. https://www.cms.gov/research-statistics-data-and-systems/computer-data-and-systems/medicaidbudgetexpendsystem/downloads/schoolhealthsvcs.pdf

40 AASA, the School Superintendents Association and the Children’s Defense Fund. “Insure Our Children, Ensure Our Future,” School Governance & Leadership, Fall 2013. Alexandria, VA. http://www.pageturnpro.com/AASA/52801-School-Governance-Leadership-Fall-2013/index.html#1

41 U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration. “A Sustainability Training Guide.” Washington D.C. https://www.doleta.gov/business/PDF/SustainGuide.pdf

42 Basch, Charles E., et al. “Health Barriers to Learning and the Education Opportunity Gap. Progress of Education Reform. Volume 15 Issue 3.” Education Commission of the States. 2015. Washington, D.C.

The Children’s Defense Fund Leave No Child Behind® mission is to ensure every child a Healthy Start, a Head Start, a Fair Start, a Safe Start and a Moral Start in life and successful passage to adulthood with the help of caring families and communities. 

CDF provides a strong, effective and independent voice for all the children of America who cannot vote, lobby or speak for themselves. We pay particular attention to the needs of poor children, children of color and those with disabilities. CDF educates the nation about the needs of children and encourages preventive investments before they get sick, drop out of school, get into trouble or suffer family breakdown. 

CDF began in 1973 and is a private, nonprofit organization supported by individual donations, foundation, corporate and government grants.

AASA, the School Superintendents Association, represents, works alongside, supports, and is the voice of superintendents and education leaders across the United States. Thirteen thousand strong and 151 years old, we remain committed to excellence and equity for each and every child in public schools. Leveraging our 49 state affiliates and national partners, we focus on developing school system leaders who can meet the challenges facing 21st century students and beyond.